Superheroes in Training: parenting gifted kids

It’s hard to be misunderstood, underestimated, asked to fit in a box that doesn’t come naturally.
Parenting gifted kids is hard.
The superhero baby may be a bit of a stretch, but not much. These kids have amazing capacities to learn, analyze, and create, but they can’t do so in a vacuum.

Time to Grow

Lately, my kids have really been enjoying intricate coloring patterns with a nice set of colored pencils (thanks, Grandma!).
As they’ve been contentedly creating, I started thinking back to all my concerns about J, who is now 8, because he wasn’t meeting the coloring milestones when he was younger the way I thought he should.

Parents Need Support Too

It’s important that we find safe places – and people – in person as well as online — who listen without condemnation and then respond, “been there. I know what you’re talking about.”
We might even find some valuable help along the way.

Finding the Right Fit: 2e kids in a “one-size-fits-all” world

Our kids will come alive as they have never before when they finally find their niche, finally find people who are on the same wavelength, with similar interests, who respond to conversation with conversation rather than the “you’re so smart” excuse of a response. People who inspire and motivate rather than constrain and frustrate.

What’s Easy for Me must be Easy for You

Some people can accept quirky, can accept differing preferences, but there’s one thing that flummoxes most people:
If it’s easy for them, it should be easy for you. They have a very hard time understanding why you’re struggling.

Gifted Kids Need Biographies

When we connect with people, even through their biographies, they can inspire and challenge us.
When we read about others with similar interests who go on to do great things, that makes us more willing to try hard things as well.