What’s Easy for Me must be Easy for You

Some people can accept quirky, can accept differing preferences, but there’s one thing that flummoxes most people:
If it’s easy for them, it should be easy for you. They have a very hard time understanding why you’re struggling.

We weren’t made for this: living in a world of input overload

We live in a hyper-connected world where people’s tragedies and struggles go viral, where we can be reached anytime, anywhere – by strangers as well as friends. While being informed and aware is a good thing, I fear that we are unwittingly hurting the mental health of our kids and young people – not to mention ourselves.
We weren’t made for this.

Gifted Kids Need Biographies

When we connect with people, even through their biographies, they can inspire and challenge us.
When we read about others with similar interests who go on to do great things, that makes us more willing to try hard things as well.

Your Messy Kid Could Be a Perfectionist

Sometimes, perfectionism looks like someone spending hours and hours laboring over draft after draft, making sure everything is just exactly so, but for some, especially those who deal with executive function difficulties, it may look exactly the opposite.

Gifted Kids and the Rejection of External Motivation

Every once in a while, though, a student came along who was so disenchanted by the educational system, so convinced that it was irrelevant, that he did everything possible to declare his independence.
By the time they got to me, at age 15, it was almost too late.
What can we do in the early years to help kids stay engaged and motivated so they don’t reject the system and end up failing out of school?