Superheroes in Training: parenting gifted kids

It’s hard to be misunderstood, underestimated, asked to fit in a box that doesn’t come naturally.
Parenting gifted kids is hard.
The superhero baby may be a bit of a stretch, but not much. These kids have amazing capacities to learn, analyze, and create, but they can’t do so in a vacuum.

Parents Need Support Too

It’s important that we find safe places – and people – in person as well as online — who listen without condemnation and then respond, “been there. I know what you’re talking about.”
We might even find some valuable help along the way.

What’s Easy for Me must be Easy for You

Some people can accept quirky, can accept differing preferences, but there’s one thing that flummoxes most people:
If it’s easy for them, it should be easy for you. They have a very hard time understanding why you’re struggling.

Gifted Kids and the Rejection of External Motivation

Every once in a while, though, a student came along who was so disenchanted by the educational system, so convinced that it was irrelevant, that he did everything possible to declare his independence.
By the time they got to me, at age 15, it was almost too late.
What can we do in the early years to help kids stay engaged and motivated so they don’t reject the system and end up failing out of school?

3 Survival Tips when Parenting Gifted Preschoolers

The early years of parenting gifted kids can be tough. You’re probably sleep-deprived, frazzled, questioning your parenting skills, asynchrony is in full force, and all around you, people are telling you to “enjoy every moment” and to “let them be little”.
Meanwhile, you’re wondering what in the world you’re going to do with a 4 year old who reads a math dictionary for fun while his friends are playing pirates and house.